Monthly Archives: May 2010

1927 Bristol Sessions –not the ‘Big Bang’ of country music? 1 of 2

Part 1 of 2 In 1984, the Tennessee General Assembly recognized the town of Bristol, with one foot in Tennessee and one in Virginia, as the “Birthplace of Country Music.” The Commonwealth of Virginia followed in 1995, with both the State Senate and the House of Delegates passing identical resolutions honoring Bristol. The Bristol Sessions […]

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Hometown wisdom in time of war

Colonel Ruby Bradley (1907-2002) was the US Army’s most highly decorated nurse. She was born on a farm outside of Spencer, WV and taught four years in one-room schools in Roane County before she became an Army nurse in 1934. Bradley served in the Philippines in 1941 where she was captured by the Japanese after […]

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Listen Here: weekly Appalachian History podcast posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the left side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with a look at the phrase “What […]

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Appalachian Sound Archives Fellowship 2010-2011

This item just posted today at the Scholarship Positions site: The Berea College Appalachian Sound Archives Fellowship Program is made possible by a grant from the Anne Ray Charitable Trust.The fellowship program’s purpose is to encourage scholarly use of Berea’s non-commercial audio collections that document Appalachian history and culture, especially the areas of traditional music, […]

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What in tarnation?

“Tarnation!” reads the title at the bottom of the Aug 1922 National Sportsman cover. “What in tarnation?” is one of a wide variety of euphemistic expressions of surprise, bewilderment or anger that arose in 18th and 19th century America. Perhaps due to our Puritan legacy, Americans were, during this period, especially creative in devising oaths […]

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