Monthly Archives: September 2010

The cabin that became a cannery

In the fall of 1941 on the eve of the United States’ entry into WWII, the Auburn High School freshman class of 1941-42 undertook an extraordinary community project. Under the guidance of their homeroom teacher, Harry W. McCann, Jr., who taught math, social studies, and English, the students decided that a place for social gathering […]

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There’s a ghost in this little banjo

Although she never gained the national recognition or recording status that other banjo-playing women in Kentucky achieved, Dora Mae Wagers (1927-1998), was—as the title to her self-produced cassette proclaimed—“A Legend in Her Own Time.” For forty years she played banjo on the stage of the Renfro Valley Barndance, and was often billed as one of […]

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Listen Here: Appalachian Weekly posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the right side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with the tale of a murderous vigilante […]

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The Siamese Twins at home in Mt. Airy

(original spellings have been kept from the following narrative  –ed.) In the year 1843, an occurrence took place of not a little importance to the subjects of this narrative.  For some time previous they had been admirers of a couple of amiable and interesting sisters, the daughters of Mr. Daniel Yeats, who resided six miles […]

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All who remained were quickly shot dead (part 2 of 2)

Ira Mullins Family Massacre aka “Killing Rock Massacre,” Dr. Taylor Hanging and shoot-out with the Fleming Brothers Kentucky Explorer [Letcher County, KY], October 28, 1893 (part 2 of 2) Soon Mullins started to Kentucky with several barrels of whiskey accompanied by his family. Taylor was notified, and scanning the route of the party, selected a […]

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