Monthly Archives: January 2011

Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the right side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with a guest post from Arthur McDade, […]

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Letting the mountain people tell their own stories

Please welcome guest writer Arthur McDade. McDade recently retired from Great Smoky Mountains National Park as a park ranger. He is the author of ‘Old Smoky Mountain Days’ and ‘The Natural Arches of the Big South Fork,’ and a contributor to ‘The Encyclopedia of Appalachia.’ He’s also written many magazine articles about the cultural and […]

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A nickel’s worth of ice, please

From the mid-19th century to the 1920s, when the refrigerator was introduced to the home, the icebox was the place to keep foods cold. Iceboxes were typically made of wood, lined with tin or zinc and insulated with sawdust or seaweed. Water pans had to be emptied daily. Initially municipally-consumed ice was harvested in winter […]

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Uncle Nathe wuzn’t no hand to set at home by hissef

“Am I to understand that our good brother was married four times?” “You shore air,” said Len. “There lays four of as good wives as a man ever had. Them tombstones don’t tell no lies. They’s all ’fore my time, savin’ Aunt Lindy, his last ’un, but I’ve hearn enough to know what they wuz.” […]

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Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the right side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with a look at the ‘pearl rush’ […]

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