Monthly Archives: January 2011

Uncle Nathe wuzn’t no hand to set at home by hissef

“Am I to understand that our good brother was married four times?” “You shore air,” said Len. “There lays four of as good wives as a man ever had. Them tombstones don’t tell no lies. They’s all ’fore my time, savin’ Aunt Lindy, his last ’un, but I’ve hearn enough to know what they wuz.” […]

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Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the right side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with a look at the ‘pearl rush’ […]

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Put the corpse in the barn till spring

Prior to the funeral industry’s rise and its use of embalming, a practice that gained legitimacy during the War Between the States, the interior of a corpse was generally not accessible to prying eyes, hands, or medical equipment. Instead, the deceased was prepared – laid out – and remained in the home until burial. This […]

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The Company Store at Ward, WV

The following post ran yesterday at the White Oak Attic site. “I’m Lisa Isbell and I run the place.  White Oak Attic is a blog about hobbies including genealogy, shabby chic decor and making a cozy homelife.” Reprinted here with permission. Kelly’s Creek Colliery, as I understand it, was the primary coal mining company in […]

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It’s winter. Engineers, to the dog house!

During the early decades of the 20th century, hundreds of short-line railroad existed across the nation, and most all were regarded by the local people as their railroad. There was something appealing about the character of a little railroad that was trying to compete with the big lines, and usually the short line’s tiny locomotives […]

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