Monthly Archives: January 2011

A ‘pearl rush’ grips Clinch River residents

“From about 1895 to 1936 Tennessee was one of the nation’s six leading states in marketing pearls,” announces the historical marker on Market St. in Clinton, TN. “Clinton was listed as one of three Tennessee towns known as centers of the pearling industry.” Clinton sits astride the Clinch River, which in the late 19th and […]

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It’s winter. Engineers, to the dog house!

During the early decades of the 20th century, hundreds of short-line railroad existed across the nation, and most all were regarded by the local people as their railroad. There was something appealing about the character of a little railroad that was trying to compete with the big lines, and usually the short line’s tiny locomotives […]

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Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the right side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with the story of a company whose […]

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They would put up a quilt

“The ladies would cook dinner, and maybe five or six of them would quilt. They would put up a quilt. I can’t remember doing any of that, but I’ve heard, you know, my family talk about it, and then, maybe, they’d eat lunch and then a lot of them would stay for supper, and maybe […]

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George W. Christians, American fascist

It is the privileged role of the Art Smiths, the William Pelleys, and the George Christians to lay only the cornerstone of fascism. It is in their rudimentary organizations that the petty bourgeoisie receives its first elementary schooling in dictatorship. It is from the Smiths and the Pelleys that it learns to scrap its democratic […]

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