Monthly Archives: March 2011

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

May the rains sweep gentle across your fields, May the sun warm the land, May every good seed you have planted bear fruit, And late summer find you standing in fields of plenty. Tweet Send to Kindle

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“Oh, I’m just taking three pigs to market” –Ohio’s Underground Railroad

By the 1820′s, several thousand African Americans had settled in Ohio. Early slave laws discouraged black settlement. In spite of the severe fines and penalties imposed by these laws, Ohioans were quite active in aiding fugitive slaves on their journey north to freedom in Canada on the Underground Railroad network. A number of small black […]

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“I’ve been bit!”

Please welcome guest author Edd Fuller. Fuller runs the Photography in Place blog. About the blog’s name, he says “I live in a rural area of central Virginia, not too far from Charlottesville. I photograph places close to home. The camera helps me see and appreciate where I live. The camera helps me develop a […]

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Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the right side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with the story of the Carter family […]

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The Carter family of Stony Creek, VA ( part 2 of 2)

(continued from yesterday…) Massive oak trees scattered their nuts on the forest floor; thousands of chestnut trees showered bushels and bushels of sweet tasty nuts on the ground. Hickory and beechnuts were food for small game, wild grapes and persimmons were food for opossums, coons and wild birds. Farmers didn’t have to worry with feeding […]

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