Monthly Archives: April 2011

A mill built plenty sturdy

The western Algonquin called it the ‘Mooskingom,’ and to the Narragansett tribe it was the ‘Mooshingung’ —“water clear as an elk’s eye.” The Muskingum River, which empties into the mighty Ohio River from the furthest point in Columbiana County, is at 112 miles long the longest river lying wholly within Ohio. And the last remaining […]

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When he drew his magic bow against his violin’s strings

During the 1870s, William Murphy of Greenville, S. C., wandered through these mountains making music every day. He, like Stephen Foster, was regarded as a half-vagabond, but he was tolerated for the pleasure his enchanted violin gave whenever he drew his magic bow across its strings. There can be little doubt that men of his […]

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Hobo Nickels

Coin collectors today consider the hobo nickel a numismatic treasure, a tribute to long- forgotten folk artists who often literally carved for their supper. The Buffalo nickel debuted in 1913, but it wasn’t until the Great Depression struck that hobo nickel carving reached its peak. During this period, buffalo nickels were the most common nickels […]

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I guess I will just have to talk Sarah into being willin’

In this excerpt from her 1979 autobiography “What My Heart Wants to Tell,” Kentuckian Verna Mae Slone (1914-2009) relates the story of how her father Isom ‘Kitteneye’ Slone proposed to her mother, Sarah Owens Slone. Kitteneye finished his breakfast real fast, then, pushing his chair from the table, he hurried for the door. “Wait, son, […]

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Valley legacy honored Grandma Moses gets a marker

The following article by David Ress ran April 22, 2011 on the NewsLeader.com. VERONA — She made the best butter around, sold potato chips on the streets of Staunton and let her eyes drink in the beauty of the Valley, which captured New York native Grandma Moses’ heart as a newlywed on an overnight train […]

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