Monthly Archives: May 2011

Amaze your friends and irritate your enemies with it.

It’s the whispering foil, the flexatone, or simply, the musical saw. Some consider the musical saw an American folk musical instrument believed to have gotten its start somewhere in the Appalachian Mountains in the 19th century (oh, I suppose we can allow that carpenters and lumberjacks all over the world have discovered that their tool […]

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Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the right side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with a look at how Mother’s Day […]

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The Presidents, the Magnolia Trees, and the Museum

Please welcome guest author Carol Ostrom, Resources Director at the Museum of Appalachia. At the Museum of Appalachia, visitors enjoy the sights, smells, and sounds of springtime as it was once known in Old Appalachia—purple martins nesting in gourd houses, the earthy smell of freshly turned gardens, the bleating of young lambs and goats (kids) […]

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He jumped on the bed, held his wife down and shot her through the head

State’s evidence portion of ‘Beck vs. State of Georgia,’ before Judge Estes, Rabun Superior Court, September Term 1885 In this partial court transcript, Eugene W. Beck is indicted for the murder of his wife, Ella Beck. He pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. He was convicted for life at the state penitentiary, where he […]

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Educating the Melungeons

The Vardy School, completed in 1929 and in operation until the 1970s, was a mission school that offered educational opportunities to members of one of America’s least-known ethnic groups: the Melungeons. The Melungeons often faced discrimination, both legal and social, and tended to settle in isolated communities such as Newman’s Ridge in Hancock County, Tennessee. […]

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