Monthly Archives: September 2011

Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly podcast posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the right side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with the story of Benjamin Parks, credited […]

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He was bitten by a Rattler, and they sent for Ira

“From his father, my father Ira Jacob Butts learned how to mix certain roots and leaves of grass together for a cure for snakebites. He never told which weeds and roots he used, and I would not attempt to try to describe them. Anyway, he would boil the roots and leaves, and would then strain […]

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Just passing through—the Scottish Travellers

Oh, Lady Margaret she sat in her high chambers.She was sewing her silken seams.She lookit east and she lookit westAnd she saw those woods grow green. So, picking up her petticoatBeneath her harlin gown,It’s when she came to the merry green woods,There she let them down. Oh, she had not pulled one nut, one nut,One […]

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The Great Pandemic of 1918, part 2

continued… KENTUCKY: On October 6, the Kentucky State Board of Health announced the closing of “all places of amusement, schools, churches and other places of assembly.” Because they were almost certainly simply overwhelmed with combating the disease, Kentucky officials did not even report influenza cases to the U.S. Public Health Service until late October. Likewise […]

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The Great Pandemic of 1918, part 1

Across America in the fall of 1918 the Spanish influenza-and the fear of it-was everywhere. The flu’s name came from the early affliction and large mortalities in Spain where it allegedly killed 8 million in May that year. No one knows exactly how many people died during the 1918-1919 global influenza pandemic, but estimates place […]

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