Monthly Archives: October 2011

Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly podcast posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the right side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with the story of the Wizard Clip, […]

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Death, witches and superstitions

KY Death comes in threes in a congregation. A wild bird in the house means someone’s going to die. A dog howling three nights in a row means death is near. If you get shingles all around your body, you’ll die. If you sneeze, cover your mouth and say the Lord’s Prayer, or you’ll lose […]

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He’d been known to escape houses through the keyhole

“The celebrated mountain lands, of which Mark Twain writes in the Gilded Age, lie in Fentress County; and the picturesque village he describes under the name of Obedstown is none other than its county site. “The court-house, on the fence surrounding which the male population of the village were sitting, chewing tobacco and spitting at […]

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When you get into your head to go sparking, go over the mountain

Appalachian writer James Still (1906-2001) moved to Kentucky after he was grown, and stayed, finally living in Hindman but keeping his original cabin, located between the waters of Wolfpen Creek and Dead Mare Branch, on Little Carr Creek, where he wrote most of his books, poems, and articles. For 40 years Still gathered sayings from […]

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Let Sears, Roebuck & Co. be your architect

A headline on page 594 of the 1908 Sears Catalog probably startled readers used to page after page of plows, obesity powders, sewing machines, and cook stoves. It announced: “$100 set of building plans free. Let us be your architect without cost to you.” From 1908–1940, Sears, Roebuck and Company sold roughly 75,000 homes nationwide […]

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