Monthly Archives: October 2011

Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the right side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with a look at the childhood forces […]

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Reviving the ancient art of tatting

If you’re anywhere near Knoxville, TN this weekend, head on over to the Museum of Appalachia for the Tennessee Fall Homecoming. Crafts and demonstrations include weaving, pottery making, grist milling, wood crafting, basket weaving, broom making, quilting, and tatting. Tatting? Tatting is the centuries-old art of making fine lace. The lace form consists of circles […]

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Millie-Christine: The Two-Headed Nightingale

Millie and Christine were born into slavery on July 11, 1851 in the town of Welches Creek, NC. The girls were joined at the spine and their owner, a blacksmith named Jabez McKay, was not sure what to do with the girls. Their parents, Monimia and Jacob, had previously sired seven children but clearly the […]

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First RFD mail delivery in America

It’s right there on his gravestone: Harry C. Gibson, June 8, 1876; April 19, 1938; Carried First Rural Mail in the United States; October 1, 1896. “He was so anxious to deliver mail, he started a few weeks before the official starting date,” explained Thomas ‘Buddy’ Owens, Jr., retired Charles Town, WV postmaster, in a […]

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You’d have that feeling then of being way far back

From 1935-1943, President Franklin Roosevelt looked to the U.S. Farm Security Administration, under the direction of Roy Stryker, to photograph people in need across the country in order to help sell his New Deal programs to the public. Ben Shahn was one of the first photographers Styker hired. Shahn worked for a part of the […]

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