We got by, I guess

Posted by | February 21, 2012

“Well, always when they’d get up, you know, early, they’d go feed their horses to get ‘em ready for the day’s work. And then they plowed with a turning plow. They’d hook the horses to that turning plow, you know, and plow. Whatever they done on the farm, they used the horses.

Just had the two horses. They worked the horses out, and they didn’t have any tractors. So they worked the horses and that’s what they farmed with. Well, a horse kicked my father; he lived about a week and then he died.

http://kdl.kyvl.org/images/klgsc/klgsculrsc021/94.18.0547.jpg
The horses was in stables and this one horse got to kicking at the other horse, so he went into . . . they was real gentle, you know, and he didn’t think about them hurting him, and he went in to get the horse’s foot out of the . . . it had got hung in the partition, you know, . . . and when he got the horse’s foot out, of course, it thought it was kicking the other horse and it kicked him.

So my mother raised the seven of us. Of course, back then girls was taught to work, you know. They helped . . .whatever was to do, they helped do it. If they was working in the garden, they helped work in the garden. If they canned, they helped can the . . . you know, the food. And, of course, my brothers was little at that time, so they wasn’t big enough to really help my dad, you know.

And it wasn’t like it is now. See, now if a widow’s left, why they draw a lot of welfare and stuff like that, but there wasn’t nothing like that then. She seen a hard time. You might know she did because the seven children. But we got by, I guess. She lived to be ninety-five years old.”

Deva Mullins
Born 1920
Chapel Ridge, KY
Interviewed June 10, 1991 for
Family Farm Oral History Project
University of Kentucky

Source: http://tinyurl.com/2g6vpo

appalachia appalachian+history appalachian+culture history+of+appalachia appalachian+mountains+history

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