Monthly Archives: May 2012

Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. You can start listening right away by clicking the podcast icon over on the right side of your screen. If you’d rather grab the show off itunes for later listening, click here: We open today’s show with a 1962 interview with Sanders Russell, […]

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How the strawberry came to the Cherokee people

In the beginning of the world, ga lv la di e hi — Father to us in heaven living— created First Man and First Woman. Together they built a lodge at the edge of a dense forest. They were very happy together; but like all humans do at times, they began to argue. Finally First […]

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Hang down your head Tom Dula

Hang down your head Tom Dooley Hang down your head and cry Hang down your head Tom Dooley Poor boy, you’re bound to die. It’s the most famous murder ballad in American folk music history. And chances are, if you know it, you know the version popularized by the Kingston Trio. Their recording of the […]

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See what a break that was? We got the 40 hour week

In 1924, when I was 16 years old, I started workin’ at the Appalachian Mill as a cone winder operator. Now on that machine, that was a long machine, it had about 50 spindles on it and I was windin’ threads from a cone up to a spool. There wasn’t a clock in the room. […]

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Documentary film maker discusses her latest: ‘Hollow’

Please welcome guest writer Elaine McMillion. McMillion is an award-winning documentary storyteller living in Boston, MA. Originally from Southern West Virginia, McMillion’s work explores stereotypes and underrepresented communities and issues in the United States. Her latest project, “Hollow,” is an interactive, online documentary that focuses on the lives of people living in McDowell County, WV. […]

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