Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly podcast posts today

Posted by | April 28, 2013

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. Check us out on the Stitcher network, available on mobile phones, in-car dashboards and tablets worldwide. Just click below to start listening:

We open today’s show with the curious story of Myrtle Corbin. Corbin was known far and wide in the late nineteenth century as the Four-Legged Woman. While at a glance one could plainly see four legs dangling beyond the hem of her dress – only one pair belonged to her; the other set belonged to her dipygus twin sister.

We’ll pause in between things to catch up on a Calendar of Events in the region this week, with special attention paid to events that emphasize heritage and local color.

The two diplomatic letters, or ‘talks,’ as he called them, did not nearly express the Bloody Fellow’s true feelings about the state of affairs between the white settlers of the Cumberland and his own Cherokee people that September of 1792. But as a chief of the Five Lower Towns, it made tactical sense for him to extend the language of peace to Tennessee’s Governor William Blount.

We’ll wrap things up with a look at a game called ‘Bank Night,’ played at over 5,000 cinema theatres during the 1930s & 40s, including the Metropolitan Theatre in Morgantown, WV. States eventually realized that Bank Night was a clever evasion of their lottery laws, and came after theatre owners to end the practice.

And, thanks to the good folks at the Berea College Southern Appalachian Archives, we’ll be able to enjoy some authentic Appalachian music by Jake Krack in a 2006 recording of Texas Gals.

So, call your old Plott hound up on the porch, fire up your corncob pipe, and settle in for a dose of Appalachian History.

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