Monthly Archives: April 2013

First bookmobile in the country

In honor of National Bookmobile Day, April 17. “Psychologically, the wagon is the thing,” commented librarian Mary Lemist Titcomb of the project she is most remembered for. “One can no easier resist the pack of a peddler from the Orient as a shelf full of books when the doors of the wagon are opened at […]

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Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly podcast posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. Check us out on the Stitcher network, available on mobile phones, in-car dashboards and tablets worldwide. Just click below to start listening: We open today’s show with the story of West Virginian Joseph Hubert Diss Debar. By 1864 he’d been appointed WV commissioner […]

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Bloody Fellow – Cherokee diplomacy in a time of war (part 1 of 2)

The two diplomatic letters, or talks, as he called them, did not nearly express the Bloody Fellow’s true feelings about the state of affairs between the white settlers of the Cumberland and his own Cherokee people that September of 1792. But as a chief of the Five Lower Towns, it made tactical sense for him to extend the language of peace to Tennessee’s Governor William Blount.

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I had never been in a community that was so remote

Said author Harriete Arnow of her time with the hill people of Kentucky: “I was especially intrigued by their language. They were as definite as Shakespeare. For example, the children never said “tree”; they named the tree: white oak, black oak, post oak, poplar, they knew them all.”

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