Monthly Archives: April 2013

Bloody Fellow – Cherokee diplomacy in a time of war (part 1 of 2)

The two diplomatic letters, or talks, as he called them, did not nearly express the Bloody Fellow’s true feelings about the state of affairs between the white settlers of the Cumberland and his own Cherokee people that September of 1792. But as a chief of the Five Lower Towns, it made tactical sense for him to extend the language of peace to Tennessee’s Governor William Blount.

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I had never been in a community that was so remote

Said author Harriete Arnow of her time with the hill people of Kentucky: “I was especially intrigued by their language. They were as definite as Shakespeare. For example, the children never said “tree”; they named the tree: white oak, black oak, post oak, poplar, they knew them all.”

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How Dino Crocetti of Steubenville became pop singer Dean Martin

As a child Dino loved to sing popular Italian folk songs and ballads around the house and at family gatherings. He took singing lessons in Steubenville from the mayor’s wife, Corrine Applegate. But perhaps he found his greatest teacher in a movie theater in his hometown. “When a Bing Crosby movie ever came to Steubenville, I would stay there all day and watch. And that’s where I learned to sing, ’cause it’s true, I don’t read a note. I learned from Crosby, and so did Sinatra, and Perry Como. We all started imitatin’ him. He was the teacher for us all.”

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Vance Birthplace: Goodbye, For Now

NC Governor Pat McCrory has signaled his intention to sign the state budget and the closure proposal if approved by the Republican-controlled legislature, a likely outcome in a broad effort to mandate savings in every area of government- except for governor McCrory’s cabinet members and house speaker Thom Tillis’ staff, whos’ salaries were immediately increased following the November 2013 elections.

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