Monthly Archives: June 2013

Interactive film ‘Hollow’ brings small-town Appalachia to life online

Hollow, an interactive documentary about the people and issues of McDowell County, WV, launches June 20 – West Virginia’s 150th statehood celebration day. The immersive, online experience is the brainchild of West Virginia native Elaine McMillion. She worked with a team of  designers, programmers, journalists, filmmakers and community members to combine video portraits, user-generated content, data, grassroots […]

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Frostburg, MD High Schoolers learn Historical Research Methods

Our first two documentaries focused on the oral histories of local WWII veterans. “Our Freedom, Their Sacrifice” was our first release in 2011 and last year we released “Out of the Sticks, Into the Line of Fire”. The 2012 release told the story of WWII through our local veterans. Rather than focus on the people at the top, we focused on what the average GI went through at the major battles during the war. Over the years we have had only a few people decline to be interviewed; most of our citizens are more than happy to be a part of oral history documentaries.

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Did Daniel Boone’s Ghostwriter Let Us See the Real Boone?

All sorts of methods have attached themselves to Daniel Boone over the years, that tell us nothing about who he really was, what motivated him to do the things he did, and what he actually accomplished with his life. For that reason, it is important when studying individuals like Boone to go back to the earliest sources, whilst always looking out for tales and anecdotes that fit the myth, rather than the man.

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Final Note: Placement of Rattlesnake Rattles Inside Instruments

Fiddler Bev Conrad, experimenting with a rattlesnake rattle in her fiddle, removed it the next day to find the rattle dust coated—“a big ball of lint, fuzz, dust, and cobwebs had been gathered up by the sweeping motion of the rattle as it wandered around the inside of the fiddle”.

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Dean King’s “Feud” — fresh eyes on America’s most famous quarrel

One day in the fall of 1854, when he was fifteen, Anse Hatfield went out in the forest to bag some squirrels for the stew pot, something he had done many times before. Gangly, on his way to six feet, Anse, whose mother called him Ansie, was always on the move, slipping adroitly through the trees, already with the signature Hatfield slouch in his gait.

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