Monthly Archives: July 2013

Appalachian Moonshine – In the Pale Moonlight

Many try to get away from the Hollywood stereotype of the moonshiner, a backwoods hooligan forever existing for most of Appalachia. To some extent that was true. It was not everyone’s story to be a part of the illegal whiskey making tradition in Appalachia, but it was a valid part of a long history in our mountains.

1 comments

Book Review: ‘Corn From a Jar’ emphasizes humanity of moonshiners

A lot of folks overlook the intelligence and creativity of many moonshiners. The stereotype depicts them as ignorant hicks, but so many of them were or are very sharp cookies. I’ve often said about Junior Johnson that he probably never read a book on physics, but he could probably write one.

0 comments

Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly podcast posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. Check us out on the Stitcher network, available on mobile phones, in-car dashboards and tablets worldwide. Just click below to start listening: We open today’s show with the story of “The Great Train Robbery” of the Baltimore & Ohio. The railroad holdup made […]

0 comments

They’d get up and swing around on the trapeze

“Well, I’ll tell you, I came from up in Washington County. Washington County, Ohio. Lived up in the country there with my grandmother. My mother died when I was a little fellow and I lived with my grandmother. Lived up there in the country and all you could see was the steamboats. There was nothing […]

0 comments

He wears the breeches but the lady has the brains

John Wesley Langley resigned from Congress (R., Kentucky 10th Congressional District) in January 1926, after losing an appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States to set aside his conviction on charges of conspiracy to violate the Volstead Act. He’d been caught trying to bribe a Prohibition officer and sent to the federal penitentiary […]

0 comments
↑ Back to top

This collection is copyright ©2006-2017 by Dave Tabler. All visuals are used in accordance with the Fair Use Law (Per Title 17—United States Code—Section 107) and remain the property of copyright owners. Site Design by Amaru Interactive