Monthly Archives: August 2013

Author Nadia Dean to discuss Cherokee War of 1776 tomorrow

Legend suggests the origins of his name. When he was a boy, his father, Attakullakulla, was setting off with a war party. He begged his father to take him along. He was too young, his father told him, but he persisted. His father challenged hi: if he moved the canoe, he could go. As he pulled the heavy canoe across a stretch of shoreline, the warriors began yelling, “Look, he’s dragging the canoe!” From then on, his people called him Tsiyugunsini, meaning, Dragging Canoe.

0 comments

“Mountain Mother Goose” Open House & Book Signing Set for Aug. 25

“Child lore is the folklore of children, by children, about children. Boys and girls have always played games, sung songs, clapped out riddles and jumped rope to rhymes. Primal drives for social intervention and acceptance among their peers universally direct youth in their own language of jokes, beliefs, jeers, pranks, rites and customs. Storytelling, imitating, singing and playmaking are thus natural ways to communicate, to develop, to learn,” Byers said. “Childhood is fleeting, but there is a permanence in the culture of childhood. It doesn’t take much for us to remember again. I hope you look into this book as a window into the world of children and as a mirror into your own deeper self.”

0 comments

He removed his eyeglasses and lit the pipe by focusing light through the glasses

When he was only five or six years old, James Brennan delivered a pail of water to a farm worker on the grounds of what today is Tennessee’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The worker took a drink, pulled out a pipe, removed his eyeglasses and lit the pipe by focusing light through the glasses. Brennan […]

0 comments

Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly podcast posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. Check us out on the Stitcher network, available on mobile phones, in-car dashboards and tablets worldwide. Just click below to start listening: We open today’s show with a wonderful old 19th century Cherokee tale set in upcountry South Carolina, by William Gilmore Simms. […]

0 comments

‘My name is Mike Fink!’ was the curt reply

He was the most famous of the keelboatmen, who plied the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers for two decades until they and their watercraft were displaced by steamboats. Born near Pittsburgh, PA (at the headwaters of the Ohio River), around 1770, Mike Fink —‘Miche Phinck,’ as he learned to spell it from his French Canadian parents—gained […]

4 comments
↑ Back to top

This collection is copyright ©2006-2016 by Dave Tabler. All visuals are used in accordance with the Fair Use Law (Per Title 17—United States Code—Section 107) and remain the property of copyright owners. Site Design by Amaru Interactive