Monthly Archives: October 2013

Dr. Emory Kemp Lifetime Achievement Award – Jon Smith

This article posted earlier today at the Preservation Alliance of West Virginia blog. It is reprinted here with permission.   The recipient of the 2013 Dr. Emory Kemp Lifetime Achievement Award is Jon Smith, a preservationist, master craftsman, and educator – a man who knows how to get things done and has the skills to […]

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Author Katherine Scott Crawford discusses ‘Keowee Valley’

While Keowee Valley isn’t a straight romance novel, it certainly has strong romantic elements, and I like to think of my protagonist, Quinn, as a romantic heroine–though I doubt she’d describe herself that way. I’m not too familiar with Southern romance as a genre, but I did read Gone With the Wind when I was a preteen and again as an adult, and if we’re talking about the Scarlett O’Hara type heroine, I think you’re absolutely right! Scarlett–and Quinn, too, I like to think–challenges assumptions about Southern women: that we’re sweet and prim and always poised, always mannerly, always well groomed and willing to stand behind our men. And most of all, that Southern women can be lumped into one sort of category, which is certainly not the case in real life or in fiction.

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Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly podcast posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. Check us out on the Stitcher network, available on mobile phones, in-car dashboards and tablets worldwide. Just click below to start listening: We open today’s show with guest author David T. Gleeson. Gleeson recently published The Green & the Gray: The Irish in […]

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Documentary honoring AT hiker Emma Gatewood heads for production

I first heard the name of Emma Gatewood as a passing reference in a script I was given when I was doing a voice-over project for the Buckeye Trail Association. The 50th Anniversary script mentioned that one of their founders, Emma Gatewood, was the first woman to solo thru-hike the Appalachian Trail (AT) at the age of 67 (today is her 126th birthday). I called the person I was working with on that project and said, “Never mind the Buckeye Trail, who’s this Grandma Gatewood person?” and that started me on the Trail To Grandma Gatewood.

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The “Fighting Irish” from the Mountains and Beyond

For all the “Fighting Irishmen” there were also large numbers of Irish shirkers. Across the Confederate army, the Irish had a higher propensity to die in action but also to desert. They seem to have bought into the rhetoric of the Fighting Irish but ultimately not enough to see it through for the Confederacy. This more complicated story of the Irish in the Civil War, just like the one in the southern Appalachians (as also highlighted for example by John Inscoe in his work on western North Carolina), is not useful to movies or politicians looking to simplify things for their respective audiences. But, it is the more accurate one.

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