Monthly Archives: April 2014

‘Big Moccasin’ aims to capture Deep Tradition of Southwest Virginia

“Big Moccasin stems from a deep, personal connection with Appalachia,” Chelsea told us. “It is a place that I visited quite often as a young girl. It was the birthplace of my grandmother and grandfather, and the home of my relatives. Southwest Virginia was a place that I would go to and marvel at its simple wonders.

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Listen Here: Appalachian History Weekly podcast posts today

We post a new episode of Appalachian History weekly podcast every Sunday. Check us out on the Stitcher network, available on mobile phones, in-car dashboards and tablets worldwide. Just click below to start listening: We open today’s show with a look at the time famous Confederate spy Belle Boyd visited Knoxville. Belle had left Virginia […]

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Frank James, of the James Gang, acquited in Huntsville

On a cold day in March 1881, three masked men on horseback, brandishing revolvers, held up an army paymaster on the banks of the Tennessee River near Muscle Shoals, AL. The paymaster was on his way with the payroll to pay the construction workers digging a canal near Muscle Shoals. The masked men kidnapped the […]

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Book Excerpt: ‘Images of America: Harriman’

Harriman has a unique history. Incorporated in 1891 as a temperance town in the Appalachians, Harriman was intended to be “an object lesson for thrift, sobriety, intelligence, and exalted moral character, where workers would be uncorrupted by Demon Rum,” as the historical marker explains. The city’s founders envisioned a model city for the world in which Victorian morality could be commercialized for both the betterment of mankind and for business profit. Harriman’s founders believed so strongly in this vision that many of them mortgaged their futures on it.

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Ohio’s Hill Country Heritage Area: Appalachian History Preserved

OHCHA is able to pay for the Inspiring Practices Awards and Appalachian Heritage Luncheon through membership fees, small grants and serving as fiscal agent for the PawPaw Festival in Athens every September, Grove said.

“Having that awareness built while we were at the conference between all the entities as to how (we) might work together, it makes that idea of more national recognition more of a reality,” Grove said.

Despite little funding, O’Grady said he takes pride in OHCHA’s board, which has stuck around for more than 15 years and devoted the time it can to the promotion of Ohio’s history.

“What always has fascinated and impressed me was how much of what is done out there is done by individuals and volunteers who have no resources, and when you start supporting those efforts, the great strides that they can make with some financial support,” O’Grady said.

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