Tag Archives: appalachia

Oh, to return once more to the days when…

“Oh, to return once more to the days when they made real country sausage and souse meat! Where grandpa and grandma smoked their long-stemmed clay pipes and would light them by dipping a live coal from the old fireplace. “Let’s go into the big house and sit by the fire and see the old-fashioned dog-irons […]

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Do you remember Grandma’s lye soap?

“Hog killing was a value for rendering out your lard and make your cracklings and we use the scraps to make soap out of. The way we made lye was everybody had an ash hopper. It’s a big square box and you put all your ashes in it that you take out of the fireplace. […]

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Hog-Butchering Day

“Butchering conjures up the image of a country diet laden with generous servings of ham, shoulder, tenderloin, bacon, sausage and spareribs. The restocking of our primary source of hog meat began every spring with the selection of four shoats. Their pre-slaughter fattening schedule coincided with cutting and shucking corn, hand-husking ears of golden grain, and […]

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Virginia and Pennsylvania wrestle over western borders

“[Virginia governor] Lord Dunmore concluded to settle the boundary line dispute with Pennsylvania by forcibly taking possession of Pittsburg, or Fort Pitt, and attaching it to the colony of Virginia. “In 1771 the Colonial troops had been withdrawn from Pittsburg, and Fort Pitt was abandoned, so that in 1774 when John Connolly, sent by Lord […]

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Cornbread or beaten biscuits? Breaking the food code

This 2005 interview with Dr. Elizabeth Engelhardt of the University of Texas/Austin ran in that school’s Office of Public Affairs newsletter. Full article here. When you sit down to your Thanksgiving meal next week, will the dressing on your plate be made with cornbread or wheat bread? Will it have oysters or sausage or chestnuts? When […]

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