Tag Archives: appalachia

No matter how mean you are, when you’re dead I ain’t scared of you

Faulkner: I heard a story ‘bout two guys goin’ to steal some sheep. One of ‘em was goin’ to wait in the cemetery while the other went down there on the side of the mountain and got in his neighbor’s pasture to get the sheep. He went down and caught the sheep, throwed him on his shoulder and was comin’ back up.

There’d been some guys cuttin’ timber over there and one of them rolled a log over his leg and broke it. And broke his leg and he had him on his shoulder, and they had to go right by the cemetery, and he carried him to where he could get ‘em into a wagon and carry him to the doctor. And this guy who was his buddy as goin’ to steal the sheep was going to help him carry it, was over behind the tombstone. And this guy come along with that guy on his shoulders who’d broke his leg. He stuck his head around and he thought it was his buddy who’d gone to steal the sheep. And he said “Is he fat?” And the guy says “Fat or lean, you can have him!” And he throwed him down and took off. And that guy with the broken leg? Got up and outrun him!

Bailey: I’ll tell one. You told one; now I’ll tell one.


When my stories are true, why, I don’t yodel to the end of the story

“I’ve been a guide now for quite a few years, and I was borned and rared in the Great Smoky Mountains, at the foot of Mount Leconte, and when I was a boy, I didn’t do anything but hunt. One day I went out to, to shoot some turkey, and just as soon as I […]


The elusive ‘Peggy Apple’ had a dark beginning

You might think of him as a sort of Johnny Appleseed of our day. Tom Brown of Clemmons, NC became interested in finding and saving heritage, or heirloom, apples in 1999. He heads out to the backcountry of Appalachia regularly in search of remnant trees. His goal, via his group Applesearch, is to save these […]


Overmountain Men Re-enactors bring King’s Mountain to life

“The Battle of King’s Mountain (October 7, 1780) was an American victory over a loyalist detachment in South Carolina during the British campaign in the South,” begins the Encyclopedia Brittanica entry on the topic. “To stem the British advance into North Carolina, a force of about 2,000 colonial frontiersmen had been gathered from neighbouring states […]


My chemists and I deeply regret the fatal results

Sulfa drugs held out the promise of being the wonder drugs of the 1930s: they cured bacterial infections such as pneumonia, blood poisoning, and meningitis. And so their use spread rapidly. Output of sulfa drugs in the United States in 1937—the first year of real commercial production—totaled about 350,000 pounds; by 1940, it had more […]

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