Tag Archives: appalachia

They made their money on the big chunks of coal

“Coal is like layers in a layer cake. And where you’ve got it cut by erosion by the valleys, why, it’s just in fingers, and these fingers went miles and miles back in there. Six or seven miles to the back side of the property. And then they retreated the mine back almost to the […]

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If you made a mistake you could cause a head-on collision

Post News Kingsport, TN May 26, 1977 APPALACHIA, VA—Miss Georgia got aboard the Virginia and Southwestern train headed for Daniel Boone (then known as Albert Yard.) The year was 1907. She showed her pass to the conductor, Captain Folmsbey. He snorted “Hmmmph. We’re going to have women operators on this line?” “Yes,” she said and […]

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He is still laughing over that checkers game

Fort Payne [AL] Journal May 28, 1941 Mr. Driskill’s ancestors on his father’s side were three Irishmen who settled in Maryland. His mother’s ancestors were English. Charles Driskill was born March 15, 1866, a mile from Portersville, in Big Valley, on the George Place. His Grandfather, who came from Winchester, TN, settled there in 1830. […]

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The workload was a killer, the heat intense

“I came from the Georges Creek coal-mining region of western Maryland. Every male member of my family began his working life as a miner. I remember my father being on a number of bitter strikes because the fight over wages and safe working conditions was an every-day struggle. “I graduated from high school in 1930 […]

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She had 9 husbands and 10,000 pieces of glassware

This widow of the South accumulated 9 husbands & 10,000 pieces of glass! Anna Safley Houston (1876-1951) single-handedly amassed thousands of pitchers, creamers, lamps, flasks, jugs, china, tea sets, platters and frilly art-glass baskets. Her collection of pitchers alone is thought to be the largest in the world. “Antique Annie,” as the native Alabaman was […]

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