Tag Archives: appalachia

All the adornments that taste and money can afford

The Gassaway Mansion in Greenville, SC is still the largest house in the Upstate at 22,000 square feet. Here’s a profile of its owners, Walter & Minnie Gassaway, taken from  “History of South Carolina, Volume 4,” from 1920: “Walter L. Gassaway is one of the very well known bankers and financiers of Upper South Carolina, […]

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It’s my skin! It’s my skin, Mr. Rickey!

In the summer of 1945, one white executive quietly, secretly, plotted an assault on baseball’s systematic practice of racial discrimination. This executive had a conscience. He knew that it was wrong to bar a man from organized baseball simply because of his race or color. He was courageous. He wasn’t afraid to buck the establishment. […]

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His excuse for marrying a child was…

May 31, 1898 Yesterday morning, Monday, I left Hyden to come to this neighborhood to see about getting permission to furnish a teacher for this school district. There are 109 scholars in the census. I want to put a Wilmore teacher here, full of the Holy Ghost, to get the people saved. Storefronts in Hyden, […]

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Some notes on Sang Run, MD

Our community derived its name from a medicinal plant known as Gin Seng. At one time it grew here in abundance. There is still some scattered plants to be found, and a few old timers still hunt for them. The roots bring a high price; they are exported to China. John Friend was the first […]

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Final run of the Bellaire, Zanesville, and Cincinnati Railway

It was Ohio’s longest-lived narrow gauge railroad. Monroe County’s rugged terrain hindered commerce and communication during the 1800s. In the early 1870s Woodsfield businessmen, led by banker Samuel L. Mooney, promoted a narrow-gauge railroad to connect to the Baltimore and Ohio at Bellaire. Narrow gauge railroads were popular during this boom era because they cost […]

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