Tag Archives: appalachian culture

I used to flesh them by hand

“I started working at tanning when I was fifteen years old and I’m 63 now. It’s hot. Like putting your nose right on the grindstone all the time– day in and day out like taxidermy. Deer hides, deer skin products, clothes, bags, coats — we do the whole thing right from the rawhide to the […]

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As Meat loves Salt. A folktale.

“Which of you shall we say doth love us most?” asks King Lear of his three daughters at the opening of Shakespeare’s tragedy. Shakespeare often re-interpreted well known tales & legends in his plays—the Lear story is a very old European folk motif that turns up in literally hundreds of variants of the “Cinderella” tale. […]

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The urge to create something beautiful from the commonest materials

“It is a happy circumstance that the first showing of this traveling exhibition of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild should be at the American County Life Association conference at Blacksburg, VA.  At the last conference of the Association held at Oglebay Park, WV, a special section of the program was given over to rural arts. […]

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Did You See My Girls on the Radio?

Listen to the mill whistle. It’s Wheeling Steel. On the dawn of a new year, this is the Wheeling Steel family broadcast from the headquarter city of the Wheeling Steel Corporation, Wheeling, West Virginia, with music by the…. On January 2, 1938, It’s Wheeling Steel, a live radio program from the Capitol Theater in Wheeling, […]

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New Year countdown

Ringing out the old, ringing in the new. Everyone’s doing it tomorrow night. One New Year tradition in Appalachia is the New Year baby. The custom of using a baby to signify the New Year originated in ancient Greece, the baby symbolizing in this case not birth, but re-birth. The Germans added the twist of […]

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