Tag Archives: appalachian history

Do you remember Grandma’s lye soap?

“Hog killing was a value for rendering out your lard and make your cracklings and we use the scraps to make soap out of. The way we made lye was everybody had an ash hopper. It’s a big square box and you put all your ashes in it that you take out of the fireplace. […]

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I studied medicine because it was a challenge, and I wanted to know

“I went on to Columbia University, as I had planned. I was just a year late. But Mother promised that I could go on and do graduate work. So, I went on up to Columbia University. I did work in Bacteriology. “And then, I hadn’t known much about hospitals or laboratory work, but then I […]

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Virginia and Pennsylvania wrestle over western borders

“[Virginia governor] Lord Dunmore concluded to settle the boundary line dispute with Pennsylvania by forcibly taking possession of Pittsburg, or Fort Pitt, and attaching it to the colony of Virginia. “In 1771 the Colonial troops had been withdrawn from Pittsburg, and Fort Pitt was abandoned, so that in 1774 when John Connolly, sent by Lord […]

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Cornbread or beaten biscuits? Breaking the food code

This 2005 interview with Dr. Elizabeth Engelhardt of the University of Texas/Austin ran in that school’s Office of Public Affairs newsletter. Full article here. When you sit down to your Thanksgiving meal next week, will the dressing on your plate be made with cornbread or wheat bread? Will it have oysters or sausage or chestnuts? When […]

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From the heart of the man farthest down

Listen to 1921 recording of “St. Louis Blues” by Original Dixieland Jazz Band, with Al Bernard William Christopher “W.C.” Handy, acknowledged ‘Father of the Blues’ and composer of such American musical standards as St. Louis Blues and Beale Street Blues, was born on November 16, 1873, in Florence, AL. He grew up in a log […]

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