Tag Archives: appalachian history

Those men would eat like hungry men do eat, you know

“Well, we used to go to the neighbors and play cards, various different kind of games, and we popped corn. No pizzas, but we popped corn and made popcorn balls. And we made those with sorghum molasses. We didn’t waste any sugar. And we made our own sorghum molasses. I never cared all that much […]

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"I’d always been a tomboy and I’d always carried a knife"

In [nurse] training we were all just a bunch of poor girls, most of us lived out in the country. Five of ‘em had come [to work at Blue Ridge Sanatorium] because they had TB and couldn’t get in anywhere else, and they found out that they could get in at Blue Ridge. So we […]

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Labor Day! Picnics, parades, dove shoots

In the hunting world, it’s a fast growing sport. Dove season opened September 1 in North Carolina, West Virginia, Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky, and Georgia. Federal authorities regulate the sport, because mourning doves are considered to be migratory birds just like ducks and geese. Therefore, the season dates, bag limits and specific regulations are set each […]

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Dr. Richard Banks vaccinated his Cherokee neighbors against smallpox

The Federal government employed Dr. Banks to visit the Indians and see if he could alleviate the ravages of smallpox. He performed this duty, vaccinated many of them, and treated many, and greatly amazed the Indians by restoring to sight a number of them who had been blind for years.

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Irradiated dimes: tourist item or health threat?

The American Museum of Science & Energy is today’s No. 1 Oak Ridge, TN tourist destination. But from 1941 to 1949 Oak Ridge was a town that did not exist. It was one of the top secret facilities for creating the “Manhattan Project” atom bomb used on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This was the site of […]

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