Tag Archives: appalachian history

It’s seed month!

The snow’s been collecting on the garden and the blooming season seems very far away. Of course the seed catalogs have started trickling in already (January is ‘seed month’ in the industry) and by Valentine’s Day gardeners have piles of choices. Appalachian gardeners during the 1930s could count on catalogues from Stark Brothers Nurseries, Thompson […]

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Breakin’ up Christmas

Hoo-ray Jake and Hoo-ray John, Breakin’ Up Christmas all night long Way back yonder a long time ago The old folks danced the do-si-do. Way down yonder alongside the creek I seen Santy Claus washin’ his feet. Santa Claus come, done and gone, Breakin’ Up Christmas right along.     The “Breakin’ Up Christmas” tradition […]

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These crackers had ways peculiarly their own

“Now to go back in history farther than my own time and recollections, let me venture upon some unoccupied territory and tell how Cherokee Georgia became the home of that much-maligned and misunderstood individual known as the Georgia cracker. I have lived long in his region, and am close akin to him. “There is really […]

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Ringing in the new

Lang may your lum reek. May the fire on your hearth burn on. —Scottish New Year toast Dropping a possum at the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve is most definitely not a traditional Appalachian custom. Please note that the folks in Brasstown, NC, self-proclaimed “Opossum Capital of the World,” have only been dropping—well, […]

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Ahh-CHOOOOO !

Cold and flu season’s here. These days a quick trip down to the local Walmart will arm the grippe sufferer with every pharmaceutical weapon imaginable. But in 1937 Sam Walton, age 19, was still 25 years away from opening his first Walmart store. Aspirin tablets had already been around since 1915, but there were still […]

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