Tag Archives: appalachian history

They tell me I can’t pull a flower after there’s a park

On June 15, 1934 it all officially came together at long last. Congress’ act dated that day noted that an area of 400,000 acres within the minimum boundary of the park had been acquired, and therefore it established the Great Smoky Mountains as a national park (GSMNP) with sufficient land for administration, protection, and development. […]

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And it’s home little gal and do-si-do

Traditional dancing in Appalachia includes several types: step dancing, set dancing, and couple dancing. Step dance traditions include clogging, buckdancing, flatfooting, and the Charleston. Set dances, involving two or more couples, include four couple squares, big set (ring) dances, reels, country (contra) dances, and play parties. Couple dancing, often referred to as “round dancing,” includes […]

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The bottle tree

Are your premises safe against haints, furies and other such ornery spirits? Have you painted your front door blue? Has the neighborhood seen a sudden upsurge of bottles dangling upside down in the trees? She knew that there could be a spell put in trees, and she was familiar from the time she was born […]

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Summer mountain meadows are full of toys

Mountain woods and meadows are full of toys for any child with eyes to see. Skipping stones across a creek or running alongside a fence, stick in hand, clacking the fenceposts—these pastimes are available any time of year. But the summer meadow has always held special treasures. Two of the best just happen to grow […]

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Juliette Low establishes First Girl Scout camp

Camp Juliette Low, in Chattooga County GA, today is a private, non-profit summer camp for girls ages 7 to 17. Juliette Gordon Low, founder of the Girl Scouts, was instrumental in getting this camp underway; in fact it’s the only camp she personally helped establish. Low brought girl scouting to her hometown of Savannah, Georgia, […]

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