Tag Archives: appalachian history

Time for a Spring Tonic

Doctors once prescribed a tonic. Sulfur and molasses was the dose. Didn’t help one bit. My condition must be chronic. Spring can really hang you up the most. “Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most” (1952) lyrics by Fran Landesman; music by Tommy Wolf Time to shed the sluggishness of winter! Up till the […]

0 comments

George W. Christians, American fascist

It is the privileged role of the Art Smiths, the William Pelleys, and the George Christians to lay only the cornerstone of fascism. It is in their rudimentary organizations that the petty bourgeoisie receives its first elementary schooling in dictatorship. It is from the Smiths and the Pelleys that it learns to scrap its democratic […]

4 comments

Mrs. Weatherly served as Librarian, Janitor and Handyman

A Fort Payne, AL city library had been established during the 1889-1891 boom and located on a second floor in the Opera House block. But during the mid-1890s depression years there was no money available for library service. Although various women volunteered their services as librarian during these years, no new books were purchased. Old […]

0 comments

The origins of Old Harp singing, part 2 of 2

Liner notes for 1951 Folkways record ‘Old Harp Singing,’ featuring the Old Harp Singers of Eastern Tennessee, by Sidney Robertson Cowell— continued from yesterday… The anthem section frequently includes fuguing tunes (sometimes spelled, and often pronounced, “fudging tunes”). Almost all of these books were printed in one or another of the various systems of shaped-notes, […]

0 comments

The origins of Old Harp singing, part 1 of 2

Liner notes for 1951 Folkways record ‘Old Harp Singing,’ featuring the Old Harp Singers of Eastern Tennessee, by Sidney Robertson Cowell— ‘Singers in the Harp’ number many thousands of people through the South and West who sing religious folksongs and fuguing tunes.  They are accustomed to meet on one or two Sunday afternoons a month, […]

0 comments
↑ Back to top

This collection is copyright ©2006-2015 by Dave Tabler. All visuals are used in accordance with the Fair Use Law (Per Title 17—United States Code—Section 107) and remain the property of copyright owners. Site Design by Amaru Interactive