Tag Archives: appalachian history

The Holly Tree (a 4th century Christmas tale)

It was about the third day on the road to Egypt, when trouble started. Joseph had stopped to rest Jack, who by the way, was grinning from ear to ear. Jack, the donkey, was seeing the world for the first time. Joseph climbed a large rock to look around the countryside. There was trouble coming […]

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Salt thus manufactured is of the purest quality, white and beautiful as the driven snow

Though few Civil War battles were fought there, Southwestern Virginia was critically important to the Confederacy. One reason was the salt works in Saltville, which provided the Confederacy’s main source of salt, used as a preservative for army rations. Two battles took place in an effort to control the works. In the first, on October […]

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Commies, Steelies, Aggies and Glassies

Before the video game, before television, the marble-take-marble world of commies, steelies, aggies and glassies kept children hunkered in the dirt and out of trouble. Marbles games like potsies and chasies flourished in many a Depression era schoolyard nationwide. S.C Dyke & Co of Akron, OH manufactured the first mass-market marbles in the United States, […]

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Blount County Alabama’s Covered Bridges

Back at the end of October Blount County, AL celebrated the 33rd annual Blount County Covered Bridge Festival. The county bills itself the ‘Covered Bridge Capital of Alabama,’ with 3 remaining historic bridges: the Horton Mill Bridge, the Swann Covered Bridge (also called the Joy Covered Bridge or Swann-Joy Covered Bridge), and the Easley Bridge. […]

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Christmas Eve at a Lumber Camp

Often during the winter evenings and on Sundays some of the woodsmen would drop in on Mr. Smith to discuss some problem concerning their work, or perhaps something of a personal nature for which they felt a need for help. Here, they knew, they had a sympathetic friend whom they could trust, and one capable […]

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