Tag Archives: appalachian literature

I guess I will just have to talk Sarah into being willin’

In this excerpt from her 1979 autobiography “What My Heart Wants to Tell,” Kentuckian Verna Mae Slone (1914-2009) relates the story of how her father Isom ‘Kitteneye’ Slone proposed to her mother, Sarah Owens Slone. Kitteneye finished his breakfast real fast, then, pushing his chair from the table, he hurried for the door. “Wait, son, […]

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For no reason he knew of he was coming alive with the garden

But, strange as it seemed to him, there were minutes — sometimes half-hours — when, without his knowing why, the black burden seemed to lift itself again and he knew he was a living man and not a dead one. Slowly — slowly — for no reason that he knew of — he was “coming […]

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Book Review: “Providence, VA”

“When I was working on my first book,” says Abraham, “I met a mountain woman who lived very remotely. She said to me, ‘If the world goes to hell in a handbasket, my neighbors are the people you want to know. They are ingenious, they live close to the land and care for each other. They’ll make it.’

“I thought about this for 3 years. I began to think about how to send the world to hell in a handbasket, quickly and blamelessly, thus a natural disaster. There are other books written about EMP from nuclear attacks, but I didn’t want to have all that geo-political stuff weighing in. I decided to have the story told from the view of a young, impressionable outsider, faced with a difficult situation.”

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When he drew his magic bow against his violin’s strings

During the 1870s, William Murphy of Greenville, S. C., wandered through these mountains making music every day. He, like Stephen Foster, was regarded as a half-vagabond, but he was tolerated for the pleasure his enchanted violin gave whenever he drew his magic bow across its strings. There can be little doubt that men of his […]

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The boldest indecent passages I have ever seen

Publishers’ Weekly 145 (March 25, 1944): “Strange Fruit banned by Boston booksellers” Says a Cambridge adage: “Banned in Boston is the trademark of a good book.” On March 25,1944 Cambridge Police Chief Timothy J. O’Leary, Boston’s Police Commissioner Thomas F. Sullivan, and the Boston Bookseller’s Association all joined in squashing the sale of Strange Fruit, […]

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