Tag Archives: appalachian mountains history

The buck flies would just eat you up

“My parents farmed. Well, it’s a good life, but it’s a hard life. They raised cattle, sheep, and hogs for a living. [Their farm] had a lot of…… It wasn’t much level land, it was more rolling hills and pasture was in… It was sorta rough land. This farm had four springs on it and […]

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But the nights belonged to youth

“[After the end of the Spanish American War] Mt. Savage resumed its gay pleasures, which led to many courtships. There was nothing better to further this cause than a long bicycle ride. “The Sunday afternoon ride up to Allegany, pushing up Moss Cottage Hill; stopping at Paul’s Store to buy peppermints and licorice candy; resting […]

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Empress of the Blues

When Bessie Smith sang the blues she meant it. Smith (1894-1937) was the greatest and most influential classic blues singer of the 1920s. Dubbed “The Empress of the Blues,” Smith embodied the blues feeling, while her songs, drawing from her sordid lifestyle, rang true with rural and urban audiences alike. Smith was born on April […]

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Hickory chickens are underfoot this month

‘Hickory chickens,’ or ‘dry land fish,’ don’t have anything to do with chicken, fish or hickory. They are morel mushrooms and they’re in season right about now. Look for 3 varieties throughout Appalachia: morchella esculenta, which can be found under old apple or pear trees when the oak leaves are about mouse-ear size; morchella angusticeps […]

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Chattanooga woman strikes out Babe Ruth

On April 2, 1931, world famous New York Yankees sluggers Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig were struck out by a 17 year old female pitcher named Virnett ‘Jackie’ Mitchell in Chattanooga, TN. “I don’t know what’s going to happen if they begin to let women in baseball,” grumbled Ruth off-field. “Of course, they will never […]

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