Tag Archives: appalachian music

Final Note: Placement of Rattlesnake Rattles Inside Instruments

Fiddler Bev Conrad, experimenting with a rattlesnake rattle in her fiddle, removed it the next day to find the rattle dust coated—“a big ball of lint, fuzz, dust, and cobwebs had been gathered up by the sweeping motion of the rattle as it wandered around the inside of the fiddle”.


The art and influence of fiddler Henry Reed

James Henry Neel Reed, known as Henry Reed, was born on April 28, 1884, in Monroe County, WV,  a rural county lying along the Virginia border in the Appalachian Mountains of southeastern West Virginia. Reed grew up in Monroe County as a member of a large extended family. His father and at least one uncle […]


In search of blind fiddler Ed Haley

Please welcome guest author Brandon Ray Kirk. Kirk, an instructor of American history at Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, is a scholar on Appalachian feuds and Southern violence. He possesses an M.A. degree in history from Marshall University and has written more than fifty articles on Appalachian-themed topics for regional newspapers and books. […]


Kentucky’s Roger Cooper: Big Sandy River and Beyond

The following article by L. Scott Miller appears in the Spring 2011 issue of Fiddler magazine. Miller is a freelance musician, writer and educator. He is the 2010 Grand Master’s Traditional Fiddle Champion and is passionate about the fiddling from his native Ohio River Valley. Roger Cooper is a link to the past for what […]


Music key to keeping essence of Appalachia

Please welcome guest author Eric Dixon, a sophomore in philosophy at the University of Tennesse/Knoxville. The following piece of his ran February 28, 2011 in the ‘Appalachian Outlook series’ published regularly in the school newspaper, The Daily Beacon. Appalachian mountain music is a tradition that traces some of its most distinct roots back to East […]

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