Tag Archives: Appalachian politics

The women of this country are going to come and sit here

Rebecca Latimer Felton, in her customary way, saw right through the political machinations that led to her officially becoming the first woman to serve in the United States Senate. When Georgia Senator Thomas E. Watson died on September 26, 1922, Governor Thomas Hardwick appointed a replacement to serve until a special election could be held. […]

0 comments

President Andrew Jackson’s rise from the Waxhaws

The Waxhaws was the scene of prolonged white-Indian violence that had largely ended by the time Jackson was born. While periodic conflict occurred in the area, Jackson was not subjected to a violent childhood that produced a lifelong hatred of Native Americans. He grew up, however, around relatives and neighbors who certainly would have conveyed their experiences to him.

1 comments

Petticoat Politics

The Petticoat Government consisted of Mrs. Minnie “Sis” Miller, mayor, and Mrs. Ferne W. Skeen, Mrs. Buena H. Smith, Mrs. Ida M. Cunningham, Mrs. Kate Friend, and Mrs. Marion Shortt, town council.

Letters poured in from around the world wishing them luck and expressing amazement that an all woman government could be elected anywhere. The State Department featured the story in its Voice of America broadcast.

0 comments

The only Kentucky county to be abolished

In early 1904, with the growth of the western end of Carter County, KY, residents there sought to form a new county. They broke away, along with some citizens of Rowan and Elliott counties, to form Beckham County, named for then-Governor John CW Beckham, who signed the legislative act on February 9. GC Brooks, appointed […]

1 comments

Lots of people thought I was an idiot

“I never spoke a word until I was nine years old. I only clucked and motioned for what I wanted. Lots of people thought I was an idiot because I could not talk. I may have looked like one, for I was a little old country boy that never cut my hair in those days […]

0 comments
↑ Back to top

This collection is copyright ©2006-2014 by Dave Tabler. All visuals are used in accordance with the Fair Use Law (Per Title 17—United States Code—Section 107) and remain the property of copyright owners. Site Design by Amaru Interactive