Tag Archives: Cherokee myths

The story of the Wampus Cat

In Missouri they call it a Gallywampus; in Arkansas it’s the Whistling Wampus; in Appalachia it’s the just a plain old Wampus (or Wampas) cat. A half-dog, half-cat creature that can run erect or on all fours, it’s rumored to be seen just after dark or right before dawn all throughout the Appalachians. But that’s […]

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How the Partridge Got his Whistle

In days long gone, when the world was new, the Terrapin had a very fine whistle, of which he was quite proud; but the Partridge had none. The Terrapin was constantly going about, whistling and showing his whistle to the other animals, until the Partridge became jealous; so one day when they met the Partridge […]

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The preacher threw the dirt out of Unatsi’s grave and robbed it

STORY OF A CHEROKEE INDIAN FAMILY CHARACTERS Hogbite [‘hogbite’] His wife Zetella [‘crane’]. Their daughter, Unatsi [‘snow’]. Their baby boy, name unknown. In 1835 the blacksmith Hogbite and his wife, Zetella, with their daughter Unatsi, fourteen, and their baby boy, six months old, crossed the Nantahala mountains to Franklin. On their return in the evening, […]

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The Brown Mountain Lights

Please welcome guest blogger David Biddix.  Biddix co-authored, along with Chris Hollifield, ‘Spruce Pine,’ (Arcadia Publishing 2009), a photographic survey of that North Carolina town’s colorful history. A true ghost story is found in the hills of Burke County, NC, where the eerie Brown Mountain Lights dance along the ridgeline of a low-slung mountain in […]

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The Legend of Uktena

“Long ago — hilahiyu jigesv — when the Sun became angry at the people on earth and sent a sickness to destroy them, the Little Men changed a man into a monster snake, which they called Uktena, “The Keen-Eyed,” and sent him to kill her (the Sun). He failed to do the work, and the […]

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