Tag Archives: crime in Appalachia

Double murder in Vinton County, part 2

…continued On November 11, 1926, young neighbor Manville Perry noticed the living room door of William and Sarah Stout’s farmhouse open, and was shocked by the sight he saw. He ran to a nearby coal mine and called for several miners to accompany him back to the farm. Mrs. Stout’s body lay in front of […]

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Double murder in Vinton County, part 1

The last time she saw William Stout, the man missing, he was mending fences here at his Axtel Ridge place, Inez Palmer told the sheriff. She’d heard her boyfriend’s father had headed out west, and was acting strangely before he left Vinton County. Maude “Sheriff Maude” Collins and her deputy Ray Cox followed the trail […]

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Bank robber Pretty Boy Floyd drops in a hail of 93 bullets

When asked by Federal agent Melvin Purvis about the Kansas City Massacre, he snapped, “I won’t tell you anything, you son-of-a-bitch.” Depending on whose version is more accurate, these may well have been Charles Arthur Pretty Boy Floyd’s last words. Tomorrow (October 22) is the 82nd anniversary of the shoot-out death of the career bank robber […]

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The Chain Gang and The Oconee County Cage

Report on Oconee County Chain Gang Mr. Newton Kelly Foreman: Visited July 11 1918 by Assistant Secretary Broyles Convicts present: 16, 3 of them being trusties. All negroes. Camped about three miles from Seneca. The average daily population on this gang for the past two and a half years has been approximately 12. We found […]

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The Harpes —Two Outlaws of Pioneer Times

On April 22, 1799, the Governor of Kentucky issued a Proclamation offering a reward for the capture of either or both of the Harpe Brothers. Reports of killings in Kentucky were followed by others from southern Illinois, then from east Tennessee, then again from Kentucky. Among their victims was one of their own children. Declaring that Little Harpe’s crying infant would some day be the means of pursuers detecting their presence, Big Harpe slung the baby by the heels against a tree and literally burst its head into pieces.

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