Tag Archives: education in Appalachia

I don’t ever seem to be able to get away from groceries

“So you wonder why I have spent the last ten years of my life behind this meat counter,” said Jack Gallup. “You think I ought to be doin’ something better, do you? Well, I’ll tell you. For one thing, I never would study in school and I dropped out at the end of the fifth […]


Book Review: ‘Appalachia in the Classroom: Teaching the Region’

‘Appalachia in the Classroom’ was designed as a teaching aid for Appalachian Studies courses and provides excellent examples for courses primarily in literature, but also in history, film, folklife and cultural studies. The content of the chapters are based largely on the background, teaching strategies and personal experience of the authors rather than a manual on how to teach specific courses and concepts.


The Sunday Lady of Possum Trot

Her schools earned plaudits from Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Calvin Coolidge, and Franklin Roosevelt. The Boys Industrial School motivated communities throughout the South to begin educating their young people in earnest, blazing a trail for the establishment of an agricultural and mechanical school in each of Georgia’s congressional districts. As a result of her […]


Frostburg, MD High Schoolers learn Historical Research Methods

Our first two documentaries focused on the oral histories of local WWII veterans. “Our Freedom, Their Sacrifice” was our first release in 2011 and last year we released “Out of the Sticks, Into the Line of Fire”. The 2012 release told the story of WWII through our local veterans. Rather than focus on the people at the top, we focused on what the average GI went through at the major battles during the war. Over the years we have had only a few people decline to be interviewed; most of our citizens are more than happy to be a part of oral history documentaries.


First bookmobile in the country

In honor of National Bookmobile Day, April 17. “Psychologically, the wagon is the thing,” commented librarian Mary Lemist Titcomb of the project she is most remembered for. “One can no easier resist the pack of a peddler from the Orient as a shelf full of books when the doors of the wagon are opened at […]

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