Tag Archives: Ft. Payne AL

The Legend of Granny Dollar, part 2 of 2

(continued from yesterday…) When the Union forces first reached Atlanta, Callahan sent his daughter word not to go in for more goods, but to stay home with the children. From 30 miles away the loud roar of cannon could be clearly heard. She declared in 1928 that she would never forget the battle sound. Callahan […]


The legend of Granny Dollar, part 1 of 2

She said she was 101 at the time of the interview in the January 28, 1928 issue of the Progressive Farmer, but she remembered the early days of childhood well. There is no doubt that Nancy Emmaline Callahan Dollar, who came to be known as “Granny Dollar,” was what is known as a character. This […]


Alarmed by the American Plutocracy

As we look over the country today we see two classes of people. The excessively rich and the abject poor, and between them is a gulf ever deepening, ever widening, and the ranks of the poor are continually being recruited from a third class, the well-to-do, which class is rapidly disappearing and being absorbed by […]


Mrs. Weatherly served as Librarian, Janitor and Handyman

A Fort Payne, AL city library had been established during the 1889-1891 boom and located on a second floor in the Opera House block. But during the mid-1890s depression years there was no money available for library service. Although various women volunteered their services as librarian during these years, no new books were purchased. Old […]


The Homestead: Cherokee Plantation

“Fort Payne is a goldmine of Cherokee heritage, and the Andrew Ross Home lies along one of the Trail of Tears roundup routes,” says Olivia Cox, a board member of the Landmarks of DeKalb County historical organization. The front of the house faces the Cherokee trading route, which can still be seen on parts of the property. The road also was walked by Cherokee who were rounded up by federal troops in 1838 and placed in a removal encampment in Fort Payne, where they waited before being forced west.

↑ Back to top

This collection is copyright ©2006-2015 by Dave Tabler. All visuals are used in accordance with the Fair Use Law (Per Title 17—United States Code—Section 107) and remain the property of copyright owners. Site Design by Amaru Interactive