Tag Archives: history of appalachia

A joy for wood: on carving hiking sticks

My Grandfather had a joy for wood, and used the woodshop in his garage to make heirloom quality cradles, hall trees and other fine things for family members and friends. The smell of wood being sanded and the look of the grains in the wood after a nice stain and finish bring joyous memories of two very influential men in my life.

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Curt Jett, the wild dog of the mountains

“Curt Jett was a member of the Hargis clan in the Hargis-Cockrill feud. Once he was under sentence of death, but the Kentucky Court of Appeals reversed the verdict and he accepted a life term without appeal. That was for the killing of James Cockrill, July 20, 1902, near the courthouse at Jackson. He claimed […]

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If we were going to quit, they’d quit, too

“We didn’t even know what a union was. We’d never heard tell of a union. But we just decided that we wasn’t going to work for this wage. We just wasn’t going to work for $10.08 a week. But as it happened, there was a carpenter and a union man, John Penix. He called someone […]

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The Homestead: Cherokee Plantation

“Fort Payne is a goldmine of Cherokee heritage, and the Andrew Ross Home lies along one of the Trail of Tears roundup routes,” says Olivia Cox, a board member of the Landmarks of DeKalb County historical organization. The front of the house faces the Cherokee trading route, which can still be seen on parts of the property. The road also was walked by Cherokee who were rounded up by federal troops in 1838 and placed in a removal encampment in Fort Payne, where they waited before being forced west.

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The First Lady Who Missed Her Homecoming

The Story of Ellen Axson Wilson’s Tragic Return to Rome, Georgia in 1914 Please welcome guest author Nancy Loveday Smith. Smith is a graphic artist, marketing consultant and long-time volunteer board member of the Rome Area Council for the Arts, the organization that is hosting the 2014 Ellen Axson Wilson Homecoming. She is a native […]

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