Tag Archives: history of appalachia

The Siamese Twins at home in Mt. Airy

(original spellings have been kept from the following narrative  –ed.) In the year 1843, an occurrence took place of not a little importance to the subjects of this narrative.  For some time previous they had been admirers of a couple of amiable and interesting sisters, the daughters of Mr. Daniel Yeats, who resided six miles […]

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The country is full of gold

Here’s a letter written by one George A. Barrows to a Lewis ______ (perhaps Coleman) in Seattle, Washington, dated June 16, 1901. It’s from the James B. Frazier Papers Collection in the University of Tennessee Special Collections Library. James Beriah Frazier (1856-1937) was admitted to the Tennessee bar in 1881, and began his practice in […]

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Summer mountain meadows are full of toys

Mountain woods and meadows are full of toys for any child with eyes to see. Skipping stones across a creek or running alongside a fence, stick in hand, clacking the fenceposts—these pastimes are available any time of year. But the summer meadow has always held special treasures. Two of the best just happen to grow […]

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Juliette Low establishes First Girl Scout camp

Camp Juliette Low, in Chattooga County GA, today is a private, non-profit summer camp for girls ages 7 to 17. Juliette Gordon Low, founder of the Girl Scouts, was instrumental in getting this camp underway; in fact it’s the only camp she personally helped establish. Low brought girl scouting to her hometown of Savannah, Georgia, […]

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“You would wear yourself down winding it up”

“I don’t know when I got my first radio, but Daddy had one of the first radios there was in Ceres. It was about as big as television is now. They have the soap operas on the TV now. Then they had “Amos and Andy” on the radio. They came on in the afternoon. You […]

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