Tag Archives: history of appalachia

Cyrus McCormick did not invent the mechanical reaper

It has become common knowledge that Cyrus H. McCormick invented and manufactured the mechanical reaper, but it was actually his father’s genius as a simple inventor that led to the family’s riches and renown. According to research compiled by Norbert Lyons, Cyrus’ mother Polly encouraged her husband Robert to give Cyrus his inventions as a […]

2 comments

Musty corn and the dread scourge pellagra

‘Musty’ is one of those old-fashioned words you don’t hear used much anymore. You might on occasion refer to a damp basement that way, and that’s about it. But in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century the word struck fear in the hearts of mountain folk. One of the great comforts of jokes is […]

1 comments

James Camak botches surveying the GA/TN border. Twice.

James Camak started his career as a professor at University of Georgia, left to make a fortune in banking, and went on to become president of Georgia’s first railroad company, a respected newspaper editor, a professor at University of Georgia (again!), and a Trustee of the college. One thing he was not though, was an […]

4 comments

Howard Finster, master of Paradise Gardens

Howard Finster (ca. 1915-2001) described himself as a Stranger from Another World, a Messenger from God, a Man of Visions, a second Noah, and God’s Last Red Light on Planet Earth. This unlikely candidate for celebrity status on the post-modern art scene became known to millions of people by the end of his life. His […]

1 comments

The South Carolina man who put the electric in "The Electric City"

Anderson, SC was the first city in the United States to have a continuous supply of electric power and the first in the world to create a cotton gin operated by electricity.   William C. Whitner, a native of Anderson, was largely the man responsible for the place becoming known as “The Electric City.” Born […]

1 comments
↑ Back to top

This collection is copyright ©2006-2015 by Dave Tabler. All visuals are used in accordance with the Fair Use Law (Per Title 17—United States Code—Section 107) and remain the property of copyright owners. Site Design by Amaru Interactive