Tag Archives: history of appalachia

They were a people called Welsh and they had crossed the Great Water

In 1170 A.D., a certain Welsh prince, Madoc ab Owain Gwynedd, sailed away from his homeland, and set down in a wondrous new land at what is believed to be the location of modern day Mobile Bay, Alabama. There are a series of pre-Columbian forts built up the Alabama River, and a tradition handed down by the Cherokee Indians of the “White People” who built them.

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No stop-leak for the dripping radiator? Dump in a handful of cornmeal!

Relatives of the gone-away families often visited if they owned a car or could get a ride with someone who did have one. Susan’s son Henry Hampton (by a former marriage) and wife Mint lived with their children in the Carcassonne community. Henry worked in the mines and owned a car of what age, make […]

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I wasn’t such a hot teacher, but we had a swell ball team

As a ballplayer nothing about Earle Bryan Combs was commonplace except his throwing arm; that seemed ordinary only because he shared the Yankee outfield with Bob Meusel and Babe Ruth, both exceptional and accurate throwers.  Combs was a dangerous hitter, a fleet, graceful outfielder, and the best leadoff man baseball had yet seen.  In the […]

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The world capital for chenille bedspreads

Calhoun, Ga. 1934. Mrs. Ralph Haney poses for a photograph in her kimono. The peacock design was made of chenille. Imagine: you’ve piled the family into the car and are driving south for a Florida vacation. You’re traveling along U.S. Highway 41 in northwest Georgia, when suddenly both sides of the road become flanked by […]

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What in tarnation?

“Tarnation!” reads the title at the bottom of the Aug 1922 National Sportsman cover. “What in tarnation?” is one of a wide variety of euphemistic expressions of surprise, bewilderment or anger that arose in 18th and 19th century America. Perhaps due to our Puritan legacy, Americans were, during this period, especially creative in devising oaths […]

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