Tag Archives: history of appalachia

The MM Shepherd store of Hendersonville, NC

Sturdy oak rocking chairs beside a pot-bellied stove, shelves generously filled with the needs of farm families, and, more than anything else, Mrs. M.M. Shepherd herself, accounted for the popularity of Shepherd’s store. Susan Frances Patton Shepherd had had no experience as a merchant, nor had her three daughters and a son left her time […]


Plumb out of Tennessee and nearly out of Georgia

Up until the early 1970s, if you found yourself surrounded by Lookout Mountain’s crisp autumn air, steaming apple cider and hot gingerbread, handmade dolls, working craftspeople and sawdust trails through the woods punctuated by the pottery of Charles Counts and the woodblock prints of Fannie Mennen, you had probably landed smack in the middle of […]


Eddie said he was just keeping his pledge to Joe

You could get the best refreshments in Fulda, OH at the Fisher Saloon. It was hopps fired brewed German beer, sparkling and crystal clear. Mrs. Frank Fisher grew the family’s own hopps, fire cooked brewed the hopps, set them in a 10-gallon stone jar with sugar added, let it ferment for five days till worked […]


A road opens — bring on the flying machines!

“The old mud road is a road that leads down to perdition. The improved road leads upward to a better land; to better homes; to a better and broader civilization,” said West Virginia Governor Ephraim Morgan as he, along with the mayors of Kingwood and Terra Alta, untied the ceremonial ribbons and let the barrier […]


When the Grand Jury met, he was not there to appear against me

The following was brought by my father’s first cousin, Roy Hodges, to the family gathering following my uncle’s funeral in 1985. It was handwritten, and in pencil. James Pinkney Pittman (1855-1946) was the grandfather of my father, Victor Randolph Pittman, Jr. The handwritten text ended in mid-sentence on the last page of the steno pad. […]

↑ Back to top

This collection is copyright ©2006-2015 by Dave Tabler. All visuals are used in accordance with the Fair Use Law (Per Title 17—United States Code—Section 107) and remain the property of copyright owners. Site Design by Amaru Interactive