Tag Archives: history of appalachia

Salt thus manufactured is of the purest quality, white and beautiful as the driven snow

Though few Civil War battles were fought there, Southwestern Virginia was critically important to the Confederacy. One reason was the salt works in Saltville, which provided the Confederacy’s main source of salt, used as a preservative for army rations. Two battles took place in an effort to control the works. In the first, on October […]

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Commies, Steelies, Aggies and Glassies

Before the video game, before television, the marble-take-marble world of commies, steelies, aggies and glassies kept children hunkered in the dirt and out of trouble. Marbles games like potsies and chasies flourished in many a Depression era schoolyard nationwide. S.C Dyke & Co of Akron, OH manufactured the first mass-market marbles in the United States, […]

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Christmas Eve at a Lumber Camp

Often during the winter evenings and on Sundays some of the woodsmen would drop in on Mr. Smith to discuss some problem concerning their work, or perhaps something of a personal nature for which they felt a need for help. Here, they knew, they had a sympathetic friend whom they could trust, and one capable […]

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Mr. Hager took pains to point out the quality of the land which he intended to give

The matter was brought about in this way. “I had proposals made to me,” Daniel Hiester, Jr. stated many years afterwards, “by the late Mr. Hager to be connected with his family. I was then young, and had not before that time had any serious thoughts of contracting a marriage. But those proposals came from […]

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Worst mine disaster in US history

At 10:20 a.m., December 6, 1907, explosions occurred at the No. 6 and No. 8 mines at Monongah, West Virginia. The explosions ripped through the mines at 10:28 a.m., causing the earth to shake as far as eight miles away, shattering buildings and pavement, hurling people and horses violently to the ground, and knocking streetcars […]

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