Tag Archives: history of appalachia

Joe Ozanic’s AFL challenges John Lewis’ CIO

In this excerpt from interviews of coal miner Joseph Ozanic, Sr. (1895-1978), Ozanic discusses the conflict between the Progressive Miners of America (of which he was president) and John L. Lewis’ United Mine Workers of America. Interviews conducted by Rex Rhodes, 1972; Barbara Herndon and Nick Cherniavsky, 1974, and now in the collection of Norris […]


Many stories of witchcraft were circulated and believed

There was a notable character, a Mrs. Henagar, who had the reputation of being a witch. Her upper eye-lids were paralyzed and drooped over her eyes, giving her the appearance of being blind. Whenever she read her Bible she was obliged to stoop over it and hold the lids up with her hands. Then her […]


Primarily an impression of Kentucky music

Loraine Wyman, accompanied by Howard Brockway, a composer and arranger, was among the first persons to systematically search for folk songs in the Southern Appalachians. The musical adventurers traveled hundreds of miles on horseback and on foot through an inaccessible world to which radios, roads and cars had not yet come. They made friends in […]


No one will live there now: it is believed that the house is hainted

This is the story of the hainted house down by Mrs. Grundy’s house. Well children, I’ll begin the evening of the quilting bee. When John and me was first married, the married women of the neighborhood all belonged to a club called the Quilting Bee. They met the first week after we’s married and invited […]


Alabama’s gourd martin house tradition

This past weekend Cullman, AL hosted the Alabama Gourd Society’s 17th Annual Alabama Gourd Show. This year’s crop of art gourds builds on a grand old Native American tradition of combining beauty with functionality. Alabama gourd artists today often draw inspiration both from Cherokee design sensibilities (classic food vessels of that tribe come to mind), as […]

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