Tag Archives: history of appalachia

“You would wear yourself down winding it up”

“I don’t know when I got my first radio, but Daddy had one of the first radios there was in Ceres. It was about as big as television is now. They have the soap operas on the TV now. Then they had “Amos and Andy” on the radio. They came on in the afternoon. You […]

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A Wheeling bellhop rises to hotel greatness

From a 13-year-old bellhop at Wheeling, WV’s McLure House to a business giant and multimillionaire—Ellsworth Milton Statler, virtually without benefit of formal education, climbed to the pinnacle of the hotel business. In 1950 he was proclaimed by his industry as the person who had contributed most to the science of inn-keeping and was hailed as […]

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Home and the school-house had both become too hot for me

Folk hero Davy Crockett (1786-1836) was born in Greene County, TN. He remained in East Tennessee until 1811, when he and his family moved to Lincoln County. They moved again in 1813 to Franklin County, where the following took place. I remained with my father until the next fall, at which time he took it […]

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She would stretch on tiptoes to reach the piano keys

A prolific composer, South Carolinian Lily Strickland (1884-1958) published 395 musical works for popular, church, and children’s performances. Her early works displayed the influences of life in the Jim Crow South, incorporating numerous elements of African American spirituals and folk music and the rhythms of Southern speech. Lily was the only daughter of Charlton Hines […]

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A childhood urge to express my innermost feelings, to record

In her book about growing up in Lonaconing, MD, Ruth Bear Levy (1898-1994) wrote about how “modern artists could create masterpieces out of the sights and sounds of Lonaconing,” how a “painter could paint the shapes and dark and light contours of the area” and how “all the pastel colors could be rolled out of […]

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