Tag Archives: history of appalachia

Some notes on Sang Run, MD

Our community derived its name from a medicinal plant known as Gin Seng. At one time it grew here in abundance. There is still some scattered plants to be found, and a few old timers still hunt for them. The roots bring a high price; they are exported to China. John Friend was the first […]

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Underneath the Huntsville courthouse, yawning caverns

“From the year 1830 to 1840, though embracing a period of great financial distress, yet was included a period of great improvement in [Huntsville, AL] and vicinity. “The old brick court-house on the public square had become dilapidated and insecure, and after discussing ways and means for several years the commissioners finally let out the […]

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Knaffl & Brakebill Photography Studio experiments with relief imagery

“RECENTLY I observed a peculiar behavior of a film of bichromated gelatine after it had been exposed to the action of light for a short time and then immersed into an aqueous solution of picric acid or sodium picrate and dried. “Those parts of the gelatine film which have been exposed to light are found […]

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The bootleg capital of Ohio

New Straitsville, OH was considered the Bootleg Capital of Ohio during the Depression. Its population of enterprising ex-coalminers concealed dozens of illegal moonshine stills in the area’s hollows and abandoned mineshafts, selling it to a nation desperate for a stiff drink. Today, New Straitsville’s bootlegging tradition is honored with an annual Memorial Day weekend Moonshine […]

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I wasn’t such a hot teacher, but we had a swell ball team

As a ballplayer nothing about Earle Bryan Combs was commonplace except his throwing arm; that seemed ordinary only because he shared the Yankee outfield with Bob Meusel and Babe Ruth, both exceptional and accurate throwers.  Combs was a dangerous hitter, a fleet, graceful outfielder, and the best leadoff man baseball had yet seen.  In the […]

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