Tag Archives: Oak Ridge TN

Road Trip to the Secret City

Visiting Oak Ridge provided a sense of scale and sense of place unlike anything I’ve read about the Manhattan Project. The Project itself was a massive endeavor, but the physical place itself is on such a large scale it cannot be truly understood unless in person.

The distance between each of the three primary sites — Y-12, X-10, and K-25 — are the equivalent of the distance between small towns in my home state of Indiana. The commute for workers from the townsite to each plant is farther than my commute to work today. Through experiencing these sites firsthand, we can better grasp the monumental scale of the Manhattan Project through its extraordinary impact on our built heritage.

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He removed his eyeglasses and lit the pipe by focusing light through the glasses

When he was only five or six years old, James Brennan delivered a pail of water to a farm worker on the grounds of what today is Tennessee’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The worker took a drink, pulled out a pipe, removed his eyeglasses and lit the pipe by focusing light through the glasses. Brennan […]

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Wheat, TN disappears at the hands of the Manhattan Project

When the U.S. Army came to what is now Oak Ridge, TN in 1942 with the Manhattan Project, one thousand families on 56,000 plus acres had to be moved. Half of those acres were in Roane County, the area where K-25 and X-10 are now. Of the people who were ordered to leave on very […]

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Irradiated dimes: tourist item or health threat?

The American Museum of Science & Energy is today’s No. 1 Oak Ridge, TN tourist destination. But from 1941 to 1949 Oak Ridge was a town that did not exist. It was one of the top secret facilities for creating the “Manhattan Project” atom bomb used on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This was the site of […]

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“It became very interesting to me that my work would somehow help the war effort”

She kept it under her hat for years, but now, the University of Tennessee’s first statistics graduate discusses how she did her part for the U.S. war effort in the 1940s, including her work with the top-secret Manhattan Project. How’s this for a job description? Manage the compilation of data obtained from a mass spectrometer […]

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